contemporary art

Morgan Buck: Goggles Glazed Over opens First Thursday in the backroom

Morgan Buck,  Puppies Want to Play? , 2018, acrylic on canvas, 64 x 42 inches. Photo by Jason Horvath, courtesy the artist.

Morgan Buck, Puppies Want to Play?, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 64 x 42 inches. Photo by Jason Horvath, courtesy the artist.

Backroom exhibition:
Morgan Buck
Goggles Glazed Over

First Thursday opening February 7, 6:00 – 8:00pm (artist present)

Portland-based painter Morgan Buck distorts and blurs images culled from the web using a smartphone's panorama photo feature and a handheld magnifier, before carefully translating the results in airbrushed paint. This process removes digital signifiers like pixelation and glitches, leaving viewers with a generatively produced work that appears, in his words, "indistinguishable from a genuine work of imaginative thought."

OregonLive: Rebecca Reeve's Sun Breathing an exhibit "to include in your New Year's resolutions"

Tomorrow during the monthly First Thursday art walk, Upfor debuts Rebecca Reeve’s new series, Sun Breathing. The exhibition remains on view through March 2, 2019. OregonLive includes it in their list of “exhibits to include in your New Year’s resolutions,” writing:

“Following her extensive photographic series "Through Looking," British artist Rebecca Reeve's new exhibition at Upfor revisits her surreal images of painted Venetian blinds superimposed upon lush, saturated landscape photographs. In her latest works, Reeve positions the blinds between the viewer and the picture where they act as a portal into the many-hued and otherworldly natural landscape.”

Experience The Laughing Snake: Morehshin Allahyari's new hypertext narrative

The latest installment in Morehshin Allahyari's ongoing series, She Who Sees the Unknown, is a hypertext narrative titled The Laughing Snake. Like other works in the series, Allahyari draws inspiration from and refigures powerful, monstrous female characters from Middle Eastern mythologies to reflect on contemporary issues. The Whitney Museum of American Art, whose website hosts the project, writes:

Using images of the snake and the mirror, Allahyari takes us though a labyrinthine online narrative that mixes personal and imagined stories to address topics such as femininity, sexual abuse, morality, and hysteria. The snake emerges as a complex figure, reflecting multifaceted and sometimes distorted views of the female, and refracting images of otherness and monstrosity.

The Laughing Snake was co-commissioned by The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Liverpool Biennial and FACT.